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Twenty-two young Native American women will compete for the Miss Indian World title this week in Albuquerque. Similar to Miss America the winner will represent all indigenous people throughout North America. But it’s not your typical pageant.
The first day of the four-day civil contempt of court hearing got off to what seems to be a rocky start for the sheriff. Arpaio’s longtime lawyer withdrew from the case and a sergeant blamed him for continuing immigration enforcement tactics in violation of a court order.
Every year the Rio Grande surrenders its waters for human use.Today there's a government-led effort to buy back water rights to benefit the river. The water will irrigate native vegetation along the banks of the Rio Grande in southern New Mexico.
After a six-month long legal battle, the largest tribe in the country appears to have a new president. Navajo voters cast their ballots Tuesday for Russell Begaye.
One of the most-watched racial profiling cases takes a dramatic turn Tuesday. Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and four officers are facing contempt of court charges for repeatedly violating a federal judge's orders in a longstanding racial profiling lawsuit.
In southern New Mexico, humans drastically altered the course of the Rio Grande decades ago to better serve farmers and an international water treaty. Today a government-led effort is attempting to restore the river to a more natural state.
If all goes as planned, Navajo voters will finally get a chance to cast their ballot for the tribe’s president April 21. The election was postponed in November over a language issue.
Thousands of mostly poor Hispanic people live in border communities called colonias with no access to running water or electricity. Now the Obama administration wants the four border states that receive federal funds for colonias to increase spending there by 50 percent.
The U.S. State Department has restricted government workers from unofficial travel in Mexican border states since 2010 when drug violence in that region reached its peak. Since then violent crime in some cities, like Juárez and Tijuana, has declined.
The U.S. State Department has restricted government workers from unofficial travel in Mexican border states since 2010 when drug violence in that region reached its peak. Since then violent crime in some cities, like Juárez and Tijuana, has declined.
A border crossing that's seen as part of a template to rescue damaged, rural economies along the Rio Grande has marked its second anniversary. The symbolic importance of the crossing was heralded by visits from cabinet secretaries from the U.S. and Mexico.
Mexico has awarded a contract to a group of Texas companies to build a natural gas pipeline from the energy-rich Permian Basin of west Texas to the border. The line would run through ranch land where many owners vehemently oppose the project. But in Texas, pipeline builders can legally seize private land under the power of eminent domain.
In an effort to attract more binational business, New Mexico will expand an overweight cargo zone at its southern border. Trucks traveling from Mexico can haul in loads that exceed federal weight limits in the U.S.
Environmental groups plan to appeal a federal judge’s decision that would allow a uranium mine south of Grand Canyon National Park to operate.
This month the Navajo Nation started taxing junk food and soda. No other tribe, and only one city — Berkeley, Calif. — has successfully passed such a law. Navajo leaders are trying to trim obesity rates that are almost three times the national average. But half of the tribe is unemployed and say they can’t afford more expensive food.

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